The “What?” of the PYP Exhibition at ISHCMC

To set up a PYP Exhibition so that students can all be successful is no easy feat. Far too often, everybody gets carried away and the best interest of the students get left behind, hidden by all the adult worries, the pressure, the community expectations, what Exhibition was like before etc… etc…

Some schools have learned the following:

  • Simplicity is powerful. Always strive to keep things simple for all the parties involved. If this involves re-educating the community and toning things down… do it.
  • Is it worth it? Teachers should continue to ask themselves this question when planning the PYP Exhibition. It may not be worth doing some of the things we make kids do. A good example is writing central ideas… if your students are used to the process of writing central ideas, or being involved in the writing of central ideas, make the most of that in the PYP Exhibition. If not, don’t. It probably isn’t worth it.
  • Process, not product. The exhibition is not a show. It should not be all about one or two days of “performance” and then it is all over. It is a process of learning, and one that should be sustainable and ongoing, even when the actual unit is “finished”. Help students to realize this and the learning becomes much more meaningful. Help your community to realize it and the learning becomes deeper than just what is on display in the actual “exhibition” part.
  • It is too late. Don’t get caught in the trap if trying to get the kids to learn and memorize all the elements of the PYP, like the key concepts, and the transdisciplinary skills and the Learner Profile etc… Focus much more on making sure their learning and their process is rich in these things. Make it your job to “notice and name” what the students are doing as they demonstrate them, not to explicitly teach them at this late stage!

To help us stay true to these principles, a number of key decisions were made about what the PYP Exhibition process, and end product, will look like. They are:

  1. We will work collaboratively towards one, teacher-created central idea.
  2. There will be four lines of inquiry. The first and fourth lines will be written by teachers, the second and third will be written by students specifically for their inquiries.
  3. Students are free to collaborate spontaneously and according to their needs. However, they will not be forced to cooperate in groups.
  4. The “staging” of the Exhibition will be simple. Each student will produce one piece of visual work to get people’s attention. Their process, their knowledge, their understanding and their emotion should then become evident to speakers through conversations.
  5. The timetable will remain as normal until two weeks before the staging of the PYP Exhibition. After that, students will continue to go to PE and World Languages but will remain in their classrooms for Music and Art. The Art and Music teachers will come and work with students in the classroom at those times. Students working on artistic or musical projects will do so in their classroom, not in specialist classrooms.
  6. Classes will open up for “Checkpoints” each week and parents will become active participants in the Exhibition process by attending as many of these as they are able to. There will be a focus each week and parents will be briefed about what they will see in the classroom and how they can be of help.
  7. There will be an informal mentoring system – members of the whole community are asked to drop-in regularly to see what students are working on and how they can make connections with them. Other people may evolve into mentors as students seek them out, rather than by them volunteering as a result of a school-wide appeal. This opens up the mentor role to people other than teachers – admin and support staff, parents, students and people from outside the school.